Ten shelters were planned, but only eight were… Behind its doors lies a long spiral staircase leading a deep below ground — there are 120 steps down to shelter level. The 1940 Blitz - and the consequent pressure to allow people to use Tube stations for shelter - jolted the Government into authorising the construction of 10 deep shelters, each holding 8,000 people. The London deep-level shelters are eight deep level air-raid shelters that were built under London Underground stations during World War II.Each consists of a pair of parallel tunnels 16 feet 16 inches (5.3 m) in diameter and 12,000 feet (3.7 km) long. Each consists of a pair of parallel tunnels 5.3m in diameter. Each tunnel consists of a pair of parallel tunnels 16 feet 6 inches (5.03 m) in diameter and 1,200 feet long. Construction started in 1940, within two years the shelter at Stockwell was completed, as well as seven others at Belsize Park, Camden Town, Goodge Street, Chancery Lane, Clapham North, Clapham Common and Clapham South. Each shelter was designed to hold up to 8,000 people. Deep Level Shelters. Built from 1940 onwards but rarely accessible until the 1944 V1 and V2 rocket raids, the London Deep Level Shelters were each designed to accommodate up to 8000 people. These shelters were connected to existing underground stations, with the understanding that when the war was over they would be modified and incorporated into the existing tube network. Each tunnel was subdivided into two decks and each shelter was designed to hold up to 8,000 people. ‘The Deep’ apparently was the nickname for the Southwark deep level bomb shelter sited within the City and South London Railway’s former tunnels between Borough and London Bridge. The London deep-level shelters are eight deep-level air-raid shelters that were built under London Underground stations during World War II. During The Blitz, the British government commissioned a series of deep level air-raid shelters to be built beneath London. Contents 1 Background From deep-level air raid shelters to the colossal tunnels of Crossrail, beneath London lies a labyrinth of tunnels. London’s Deep Level Air Raid Shelters Kaushik Patowary Sep 28, 2016 2 comments When the Second World broke out in Europe, and London became the prime bombing target, people began to pour into the platforms of the London Underground —the city’s subway system— every night to escape the nightly bombings of the 1940 London Blitz. The tunnels of Clapham South are the deepest of the deep-level shelters, and sit beneath the Northern line. The deep-level shelter at Clapham South is therefore celebrated not only for its role in protecting Londoners from the worst excesses of the Blitz but also its fascinating and positive contribution towards helping make London one of the most culturally, socially and economically diverse places in … What is perhaps less well known, however, is the role played by the Deep Level Shelters – the remains of which can still be seen at street level. Originally there were plans for deep level shelters to be built under ten of the London underground stations on the Northern Line. The London deep-level shelters are eight deep-level air-raid shelters that were built under London Underground stations during the second World War. The London deep-level shelters are eight deep level air-raid shelters that were built under London Underground stations during World War II. Inside the shelter itself, the effect is even more striking.